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Home FEATURES Alex Lukas Interview

Alex Lukas Interview
Written by Caleb Neelon   
Saturday, 09 February 2008 02:50
This RISD graduate and one time Andrew Schoultz assistant and Cantab Publishing founder has settled in Philly working on his art 12 hours a day @Space 1026.

By Caleb Neelon

Lukas in his studio at Space 1026.

Cambridge, Massachusetts native and current Philadelphia resident and Space 1026er Alex Lukas will be coming to San Francisco in January for a show at White Walls in the Tenderloin. He'll be showing his delicately rendered landscapes on paper, works that capture a kind of magical, high-velocity serenity of a compelling image seen from a moving train. Yet while his images certainly stand on their own – I'm fortunate to have a few in my house, and without fail, my visitors' eyes all settle on them – what makes Alex one of my favorite artists today is his breadth. His 'zines, illustration work, and other projects are all so refined that each one only adds depth to the other. It certainly makes an art career easier if you have one 'thing' you do, and you beat the hell out it, but as much as Alex shoots himself in the foot by maintaining such a diverse output – a great deal of which his name doesn't appear on – the more I appreciate it. And the more you learn about the scope of his work, the more you'll enjoy each element of it, I assure you.

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(Untitled), 2007. Watercolor, ink, gouache, acrylic, enamel, silkscreen and spray paint on paper, 18in x 21.25in

Introduce yourself, dude.

My name is Alex Lukas, I'm from Cambridge, Massachusetts, I make drawings and run a small 'zine publishing company as well as doing the occasional illustration and writing project.

What's bringing you to SF in January?

I'm doing a show of works on paper at White Walls with Chris Pew and Amy Casey. I'm showing about 15 new pieces including a few larger scale drawings that I am excited about. They are part of this ongoing series of drawings of disaster I have been working on for a few years now. I think the show opens on January 12th.

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Work for the White Walls show.

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A new drawing for White Walls; Watercolor, ink, gouache, acrylic, enamel, silkscreen and spray paint on paper, 12in x 16in.

Ever since I've known you – which is since you were what, 18? – you've been doing really lovely little 'zines. I've always admired the craftsmanship and design you put into these things, whether it's a silk-screened cover or a little cut-out, there's always some little detail that puts them a cut above the other cool little 'zines that people hand me. When did you make your first ones?

I made a little Xerox comic in elementary school, like 5th grade, but after that, I think I started making zines again when I got to college. In high school these girls Lennele and Chara made a 'zine that I did a bunch of drawings for. The only one I can remember was a black power afro-pick.

I came up with the Cantab Publishing name about 6 years ago and it was then I got the P.O. Box, which I guess is how I mark the real beginning of Cantab.

alexlukas03.jpg
(Untitled), 2007. Watercolor, ink, gouache, acrylic, enamel, silkscreen and spray paint on paper, 10in x 13in.

alexlukas04.jpg
(Untitled), 2007. Enamel and spray paint on book page. 9.5in x 13.5in.

Can you talk about Cantab Publishing and what it's been evolving into?

Well, it really started as me making 'zines I would make to give to friends, like most 'zines start. I have put out over 20 titles over the past six years or so, and with a general run of about 100, I figure I have made, by hand, about 2,000 zines or so.

To date, there have been a lot of different 'zines about stuff I do or that friends do, that while they may be slightly different in subject matter, I think that a lot of the ideas cross over. Like, I'll put out a comic that I hope a kid who is into graffiti will be excited about, and then put out a 'zine about graffiti that hopefully a kid who is into comics would be interested in. I just hope to cross-pollinate ideas. My next goal is to present ideas in a way that really capitalizes on that they are in presented in book form. That has always been important to me, even if I haven't achieved it yet, but the form of "book", with it's beginning, middle and end is so intrinsic in the way we interact with the objects. I think that this form is super under-utilized, if not totally ignored in 'zines today.

It also seems that, for the most part, 'zines have separated themselves into two. On one hand you have you punk rock 'zines that are filled with a ton of information, but they look like shit. Well, not shit, but they have their own design aesthetic. Then you have your 'artist' 'zines that are filled with a ton of drawings, but beyond that, there is no new information in them, they are sketch exhibitions you can hold. I really hope to eventually start making 'zines that bridge this gap, 'zines that are art objects but that convey information, 'zines that take advantage of the fact that they are a book. I don't think I have done that yet, but that is the goal. I think Brendan Fowler's Sex Sells 'zine/book with the Barry McGee cover and the Steve Keene painting was a great art object that also conveyed a great amount of information.

Think it'll ever make you a dollar?

Maybe this is a cop out response, or a continuation of the grand tradition of me shooting myself in the foot, or my problem of not really being able to commit to one thing, but I almost hope it never makes a dollar. I mean, I never want to have to treat it as a business. So far, the books have only cost as much as I have and I no more than I am willing to lose. All the Xerox 'zines just cost time, really, and the few projects I have had professionally printed, were either funded with money from outside sources (Spothunters was paid for in part with the loot I won from that Tokion King of Zine competition, as well as some funding you got for the show) or with money I saved that I wanted to spend on having something made.

On the flip side, I do become precious with my 'zines, I think that only having 100 of something makes you cautious about where they go. I charge a little bit of money so hopefully one 'zine pays for the next. I would love to get to a place where I can have stuff printed and just give it away. I think some of the best publications out today are free. Dan Murphy and Tony Smyrski's Megawords Magazine is an amazing, free publication. ANP Quarterly. Even Vice, as much as I'd like to say I hate it, once you get past the "Do's and Don't"s (I'm a little salty because I was a "Don't" once) they really explore some interesting topics. What was that in the last issue, where they talked to US soldiers who had deserted and gone to Canada? You really don't see that type of stuff many places. And it is free. Even before I knew about Vice, the free comics newspaper Paper Rodeo was an amazing publication. Doing something you can just give away also alleviates the awkward problem of nervously looking for your 'zines behind others, three years after you dropped them off, before you try to collect the consignment from the guy at the counter who really doesn't want to pay out that ten dollars or whatever it is he owes you. I really hate that.

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Working on a big drawing.

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Washing out a screen used for a big drawing. (Photo: Meg Kemner)

Lemme lay a guilt trip now. You, like pretty much every other creative young person, bailed on Boston and left for somewhere else. Why?

I bailed on Cambridge, sure, but after 18 years straight, including 13 years of public school, and a few summers to boot, I think I deserve a change of scenery. And Boston is a hard place to be a young artist. We talk about this all the time, it isn't a great city when it comes to supporting it's own. Having said that, I think growing up a place, especially in Cambridge, where so much of the art money is wrapped up in community mural projects, it is hard to open your eyes to the new possibilities and new opportunities. I know there is a lot going on down "South of Washington" or whatever they are calling Harrison Ave in Boston now, but I never went down there as a kid, so I find it hard to have reason to go down there now. There just seem to be more opportunities for me elsewhere right now.

I have always said that I think I will end up back in Cambridge, but I think that I need to see some other places. And while it has changed so much, there is still an idealism there that I enjoy. I highly value the education I got in the public schools, the general politics of that town, my friends, my friends parents. We talk a lot about Cambridge Moms (I have one), those strong women with who dress a little quirky, have radical political beliefs and houses filled with books and photographs and old records and never throw anything away, I like that a lot. I want to have a home like that when I'm a little older. I'm also happy that so many kids I knew growing up are now back working and teaching in the public school system, (my dad worked at the high school for years too) I know if I raise my kids in Cambridge, they will be in good hands, and that is super important to me. Cambridge is also a place that, once you live there, it never really goes away. Everywhere you go you run into people with a connection to Cambridge. It really is a bond between like-minded people. So I do plan on returning one day. If it will be like what I want it to be when I'm ready to go back, that is a whole other question, but I hope it will be.

And you've now begun to settle in to Philly as a member of Space 1026. How's that been?

I don't want to speak too much about Phila, since I really haven't explored here much, but 1026 is great. I'm here most days from about 10 in the morning to midnight, seven days a week. My good friend Will Buzzell invited me to share his studio and I am super thankful that he got me here. Young people here are really invested in the city, in the community, in making it work. Kids here are buying homes. Beyond the fact that it is affordable to do so, it really speaks to a commitment to the city, to the longevity of people's involvement.

I'm also excited about our line up for the gallery next year. January has a solo show by Brian Willmont that opens on the 4th of that month, Brian and I are also doing a two person show up at Park Life in April I think. Then Justin B. Williams is coming through in February with some friends to do something that I'm sure will be amazing. I think the gallery space at 1026 is one of the most under-recognized in the country. Over the past ten years, they have had so much good stuff come through here, and we have so much good shit planned, but it is still a struggle to get people to notice what we have going on and to get people outside of Phila clued in and excited.

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Top to bottom: A silkscreen of a comic originally printed in The Drama #8, a home made Iron Man mask, a friend's drawing, and a Batgirl mask from the late '60s.

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Home made Iron Man masks on the drying rack

Before Philly, you did a little US tour. Where did you go and what were highlights?

I left Brooklyn after three years of living there. Basically, I got a job delivering food on my bike in Bushwick about a week after moving to New York. I ended up waiting tables at that same restaurant for the rest of my time in New York. I just got really comfortable, which is sometimes a bad way to be. Then opportunity came up to move back to Boston and help my friend Ryan renovate a house while we lived in it, working in exchange for free rent. I moved my stuff back to Boston, said goodbye to Brooklyn, went to Stockholm for a week to do a show with some friends at Galleri Loyal. When I came back I was immediately living back in Boston, where I ended up staying a little longer than I had planed.

When I finally got on the road, my first stop was St. Louis where I slept on my friend Joe's couch for about three weeks. I had a blast just exploring the city and drawing. Then, after a few weeks back in Boston, you and I drove out to Denver to do that show with Justin B. Williams and Becky Suss at Limited Addiction.

Then after about a week in Denver, when you flew back east, I ended up heading west to Oakland. My best friend Kareem had been living out there for a while and kept bugging me to visit, so I found a sublet for the summer (I took Nick Meyer's room, he is a photographer everyone should know about). I ended up working 3 days a week at a pizza spot/bar on Telegraph Ave and 3 other days a week as Andrew Schoultz' assistant. It was a super fun summer, between Andrew and Andres from White Walls buying me beers some days and working at a bar the others, I probably drank a little more than I should have, but that's alright. I'm heading back soon for the White Walls show.

Basically, in the past six months I have driven about 18,000 miles.

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A drawing in Street World (Abrams, 2007).

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Comic Fans, this was intended to be the A-Z for Swindle #14, but somehow the file was messed up and it didn't print right in the issue.

Back when, you went to RISD and lived in Providence at what seemed to me like the tail end of a really creative period in that city. What was that like for you?

That period in Providence history was dominated by Fort Thunder. I got there in the fall of '99, right before Paper Rodeo started to be published, but when that 'scene' was already hugely influential. Honestly, and I kick myself daily for this, I should have paid more attention to what was going on. When I got there the kids who were into the Fort Thunder stuff were really 'cool' and so I think I had the easy but natural knee-jerk reaction of someone on the outside, I hated on it. In my defense though, it was also hard at that time to distinguish between the originators and the imitators. There were so many silk-screening comics kids doodling on notebook paper. Someone came up with the phrase 'Faux Thunder' to describe a lot of the work that kids were doing then. I think, like a lot of things, when you are introduced to something at the height of when it is being imitated, it is hard to distinguish the good from the not so good. I'm glad that now, today, a lot of the really amazing things from that era are starting to rise to the top and be recognized, there was just so much imitation at that point. But The Fort itself was an amazing place the few times I went.

The Halloween parties will always stick in my mind, crawling through some maze held up by 1x3s and cardboard, emerging in the room with the keg, everyone smoking cigarettes with no exit except on your belly and the floor would be cover with dried leaves. It was a death trap and it was amazing. And it seems like even the smallest event at the fort would spawn a five-color silkscreen poster. The work ethic of that place is something that even at the time I could recognize. It also really inspired Space 1026, and I'm sure countless other like-minded places. But back to that time, after the kids at Fort Thunder got evicted in 2002 I think it was, there was this boom of illegal live/work/play spaces with funny names over on that side of town, and going to them, and maybe it was just because they didn't have years of accumulated stuff, or because it was all done in such a rush, done in a need to fill the void, it somehow felt less sincere to me. Who knows if it was or not, but that is how I felt, again, as a virtual outsider to that scene.

So, back on topic, I was not involved at all in that stuff when I was in Providence. I should have paid more attention. I'm embarrassed to say I didn't even see Lighting Bolt 'till 2005. When I moved to New York after school, I think I quickly realized the lack of that type of creative energy, and I hate the term, but DIY energy, was something I really missed, and I began to realize what had been going on in Providence was really special and unique. Luckily, my buddy Matt had gotten doubles of most of the old Paper Rodeos (including the all comics issue College Hill Indy) so I have those to look through now. And that period in Providence has been pretty well documented, thankfully. The Wunderground show at the RISD Museum last year did a great job of collecting a ton of posters from that time. I walked into that show and was bowled over, there were so many posters that I had only seen half obscured or half torn down. I even found a poster I designed for Brown Student Radio in the mix. You have no idea how happy I was to be included with that company, even in the most miniscule of ways.

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The Cantab Publishing "warehouse," a.k.a. the bottom shelf in Lukas' studio.

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Spreads from Melee #1, Cantab Publishing, 2007.

Your Under Providence project is gonna keep you tied to that place – you want to explain to people what that's like?

Yeah, another important place in Providence's youth or "underground" (pardon the pun) history, in my opinion, is the old abandoned train tunnel that runs a mile underneath College Hill. I spent a lot of time exploring it when I was in college, so for the past three years, working very sporadically, I have been doing research and interviews with people who have interacted with the tunnel; graffiti writers, college kids, older rail workers. The eventual goal is to put out a massive book documenting the many facets of its history. The tunnel, which was for a time Providence's graffiti hall of fame, really served as a place where RISD kids and local kids could meet on an equal footing, across social lines, something that doesn't happen often. There was a riot there in 1993 after a May Day party, punk rock shows were thrown inside: there are a ton of stories about the place.

But beyond that, the tunnel also really serves as a symbol of Providence, to me. It was opened in 1908 as a commuter link between the booming towns on eastern shore of Rhode Island and down town Providence, then as the automobile came into it's own and ridership on the commuter line dwindled. Freight was carried through until 1981, but as one person told me, Providence simply stopped manufacturing things to carry over the rails, so the tunnel was abandoned. Providence as a whole, at that time, was really, really down. Now, as Providence continues to go through its 'Renaissance' the right of way to the tunnel has been turned into a parking lot for million dollar condos. I also find the actual space of the tunnel, the act of walking through it, to be borderline spiritual, so I really want to explore not only that feeling, but the challenge of conveying that feeling through a printed book to someone who has never been there.

I don't know if I ever tried to make scratchy comics like those that came out of things like Paper Rodeo. I think I ripped those kids off a lot more in terms of my silkscreen aesthetic. But one comics artist that I constantly try to rip off, who I was lucky enough to have as a teacher, is David Mazzuchelli. I think his influence, not just on me, but on a lot of underground comics and illustration today is highly under-rated. His drawing style is filled with deceptively loose, inky brushwork and yet he manages to make every line, every stroke hits exactly where it needs to. He was also, as far as I understand it, one of the first people to start printing underground comics using just a black and one pantone. The Rubber Blanket anthology he co-published with his wife, Richmond Lewis, has been a huge influence. Between him and my old roommate (another former Mazzuchelli student), R. Kikuo Johnson, I really ought to just cut a royalty check.

But back to that scratchy, Fort Thunder stuff, if you look at the really great comics work to come out of that era, Brian Chippendale's work, Mat Brinkman's stuff, Leif Goldberg's, Jim Drain's and more recently CF and Ben Jones, the drawing is incredibly smart, every line counts in all of those guys' comics. They make it look easy and it I can see it coming off as naive, but it is so intricate and it is really intelligent, informed comic making.

A spread from SPOTHUNTERS, Cantab Publishing, 2006.

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A spread from SMASHY SMASH, Cantab Publishing, 2005. This 'zine won the Tokion King of 'Zine contest back in '05.

In the illustration work you do, like stuff for Swindle Magazine, for the Street World book that Roger Gastman and Tony Smyrski and I put together, as well as your Cantab comics, you do tons of figurative work. But in the studio art you hang in galleries, most of the work you do now is a combination of landscape and architecture. No people. Why is that?

For me, all the work I do, the 'zines, the illustration, the gallery work, it all satisfies different needs. I know it is confusing, and I know I am probably shooting myself in the foot by utilizing very different styles for different projects so people don't quite know what they are going to get, but it is important to me to be able to explore different ideas in different manners. I compartmentalize my work intentionally, the illustration/commercial work really geared towards re-production, it is intended to be printed and distributed and accompanied by other material, be that text or photographs or whatever. That work also really allows me to explore humor and my somewhat nerdy comic book interests. I try to make people laugh with that stuff, or at least smile and shake their head.

My studio drawings, on the other hand, are inspired a lot by contemporary media imagery, be it on the news or in blockbuster movies, I'm very interested in the dominance of images of America destroyed. Even before September 11th this has been a common theme, but one of the things I think we all found startling about the news footage from that day was how right Hollywood got it.

I mean, no one was really surprised to see how it looks when a plane hits a building. The act itself was astounding, but the visuals were not new. The reality of it, the fact that the lights didn't come up and we didn't leave the theater: that is what was shocking. I really started exploring these images of the destruction of the American landscape right before Katrina. Watching the news, I had a morbid, awful fascination with the pictures of what was going on down there because that is what I had been trying to draw. It went from being fiction to on TV. I mean, the drawings I make are still are fictitious, but the images explore that we have seen paralleled in real life.

Can you talk a bit about the media involved in your gallery pieces? It might not be obvious to people who don't have one directly in front of them, but they're a combination of a ton of different stuff.

Yeah, I really throw a lot at these drawings, different tools for different marks. Most pieces involve some combination of watercolor, ink, acrylic, gouache, enamel, silkscreen and spray-paint on paper. I also sometimes draw into already printed material, mostly aerial shots of cities I tear out of books. I think that it is a little confusing for some people, because sometimes the distinction between what I have drawn and what I have appropriated isn't always immediately apparent. And I think that is fine. They are not meant to be straightforward narrative drawings, they are intended to be slightly obscured. If I can extend that to the execution, so you cant tell immediately how I made them, I'm happy. If I can use a bunch of different methods to make one coherent body of work, where it takes people a second to recognize what is made with what, that is fine to me. These drawings are intended to be slightly confusing, I hope it adds to the sense of unease and anxiety that I am trying to hint at.

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Work for the White Walls show.

Untitled (Field with Fences), 2007. Ink, watercolor, acrylic, gouache, enamel, silkscreen and spray paint on paper. 50" x 77"

Factory #10, 2007. Ink, watercolor, acrylic, gouache, enamel, silkscreen and spray paint on paper, 10.75" x 14.75"

alexlukas.com {moscomment}

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Alex Ziv in Berkeley Saturday
Thursday, 24 April 2014 09:31

Alex Ziv who we showed last year in Going Nowhere with Mario Ayala opens a solo show featuring new works at The League in Berkeley this Saturday 4/26. ~see some of Ziv's new works

 

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Wednesday, 16 June 2010 16:39


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Photos from his 2011 show at Guererro Gallery - Photos from his 2012 Halsey McKay show in New York - he curated this show for FFDG in '11

Ryan Travis Christian April 25th at Western Editions, Chicago

 

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Wednesday, 25 April 2012 10:56

 

Ryan De La Hoz at Seattle's Flatcolor
Tuesday, 22 April 2014 10:52

SEATTLE --- San Francisco based Ryan De La Hoz opens a show of new works at Flat Color on May 1st. We love Ryan's work and have shown it many times throughout the years. Ryan will be also showing at LA - Juxtapoz Psychedelic Show, The Well, LA, CA April 26th 2014 - SF - Paper Cuts, Spoke Art, SF, CA May 3rd 2014

Working in unconventional mediums such as woven blankets, puzzles, and faux marble, De La Hoz has pioneered an innovative style in a class of its own. Collages of white noise, flowers and tie-dye are all hand cut and assembled to create mystic portals of intrigue. Heavily influenced by themes of death and rebirth, past and present, and the collision of modern culture with antiquity; Form and Void is mysterious look into the odyssey of creation, destruction, and an examination of society at large. -show details

 

SSSSHHH, It's the Quiet Life
Monday, 21 April 2014 12:03

Hats, all over prints, 5 panel hats... it's all a bit obvious, but it's also how we dress and the QUIET LIFE'S PALM SPRINGS COLLECTION is looking breezy for the summer with no socks in the desert dust. ~take a tour

 

"Arrangement" by Michelle Fleck
Friday, 18 April 2014 10:23

This morning we take a closer look at this beautiful painting by San Francisco based Michelle Fleck now showing at FFDG.

Arrangement measures 24"x30", acrylic and aerosol on panel - inquires: info(at)ffdg.net

Michelle Fleck is a painter living in San Francisco. Her work focuses on the relationship between man and the landscape, and the marks we leave on it. Influenced by everyday life in the city, her paintings serve as snapshots of an ongoing intersection of the natural and man-made world. She strives to make work that has a sense of relevancy in a culture driven by a need for change and newness.

 

Nychos Friday @Fifty24SF
Thursday, 17 April 2014 10:46

SAN FRANCISCO --- You've seen the murals pop up around town the last week from this Austrian street artist as he prepares for his solo show at Fifty24SF opening this Friday, 4/18.

GET THE SHOW DETAILS --- a bunch of NYCHOS

 

Banksy's Mobile Lovers
Wednesday, 16 April 2014 10:47

Speaking of Banksy (wait, were we speaking of Banksy?)... In any case, love his newest creation "Mobile Lovers" located in Bristol, England.

I love you, dear.... Huh? Wut?

 

Jeremy Fish Opening a Solo Show in August at FFDG
Tuesday, 15 April 2014 09:33

Met up with Jeremy Fish last night to catch up and discuss his upcoming solo show opening this August at San Francisco's FFDG. Don't want to give too much away, but the guy is very busy these days. You know the giant pink bronze statue will be built and installed at the corner of Haight and Laguna welcoming those to the Haight (check) in 2015? Going to be incredible.

Check photos from his last San Francisco solo show in 2012, and mark your calendar for August as his next solo show opens at FFDG.

Beering with Fish at his favorite watering hole, Zeitgeist

 

Statue Of A Homeless Jesus Startles A Wealthy Community
Monday, 14 April 2014 10:20

Sculpture of Jesus as homeless and sleeping on a park bench is "freaking out" the neighbors of this wealthy NC suburb. The sculptor, who has an affinity for street art, created it to remind us that "We believe that that's the kind of life Jesus had," Buck says. "He was, in essence, a homeless person." ~READ ON

 

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ClipODay II: Needles & Pens 11 Years!!

Congrats on our buddies at Needles and Pens on being open and rad for 11 years now. Mission Local did this little short video featuring Breezy giving a little heads up on what Needles and Pens is all about.


BANDES DE PUB / STRIP BOX

In a filmmaker's thinking, we wish more videos were done in this style. Too much editing and music with a lacking in actual content. Just because you can doesn't mean you should.


AJ Fosik in Tokyo at The Hellion Gallery

Matt Wagner recently emailed over some photos from The Hellion Gallery in Tokyo, who recently put together a show with AJ Fosik (Portland) called Beast From a Foreign Land. The gallery gave twelve of Fosik's sculptures to twelve Japanese artists (including Hiro Kurata who is currently showing in our group show Salt the Skies) to paint, burn, or build upon.


Ferris Plock - Online Show, April 25th

FFDG is pleased to announce an exclusive online show with San Francisco based Ferris Plock opening on Friday, April 25th (12pm Pacific Time) featuring 5 new medium sized acrylic paintings on wood.


GOLD BLOOD, MAGIC WEIRDOS

Backwoods Gallery in Melbourne played host to a huge group exhibition a couple of weeks back, with "Gold Blood, Magic Weirdos" Curated by Melbourne artist Sean Morris. Gold Blood brought together 25 talented painters, illustrators and comic artists from Australia, the US, Singapore, England, France and Spain - and marked the end of the Magic Weirdos trilogy, following shows in Perth in 2012 and London in 2013.


Jeremy Fish at LA's Mark Moore Gallery

San Francisco based Fecal Pal Jeremy Fish opened his latest solo show Hunting Trophies at LA's Mark Moore Gallery last week to massive crowds and cabin walls lined with imagery pertaining to modern conquest and obsession.


John Felix Arnold III on the Road to NYC

Well, John Felix Arnold III is at it again. This time, he and Carolyn LeBourgios packed an entire show into the back of a Prius and drove across the country to install it at Superchief Gallery in NYC. I met with him last week as he told me about the trip over delicious burritos at Taqueria Cancun (which is right across the street from FFDG and serves what I think is the best burrito in the city) as the self proclaimed "Only overweight artist in the game" spilled all the details.


FRENCH in Melbourne

London based illustrator FRENCH recently held a show of new works at the Melbourne based Mild Manners


Henry Gunderson at Ever Gold, SF

Ever Gold opened a new solo show by NYC based Henry Gunderson a couple Saturday nights ago and it was literally packed. So packed I couldn't actually see most of the art - but a big crowd doesn't seem like a problem. I got a good laugh at what I would call the 'cock climbing wall' as it was one of the few pieces I could see over the crowd. I haven't gotten a chance to go back and check it all out again, but I'm definitely going to as the paintings that I could get a peek at were really high quality and intruiguing. You should do the same.


Mario Wagner @Hashimoto

Mario Wagner (Berkeley) opened his new solo show A Glow that Transfers Creativity last Saturday night at Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco.


Serge Gay Jr. @Spoke Art

The paintings in the show are each influenced by a musician, ranging from Freddy Mercury, to Madonna, to A Tribe Called Quest and they are so stylistically consistent with each musician's persona that they read as a cohesive body of work with incredible variation. If you told me they were each painted by a different person, I would not hesitate to believe you and it's really great to see a solo show with so much variety. The show is fun, poppy, very well done, and absolutely worth a look and maybe even a listen.


NYCHOS Mural on Ashbury and Haight

NYCHOS completed this great new mural on the corner of Haight and Ashbury in San Francisco on Tuesday. Looks Amazing.


Sun Milk in Vienna

With rising rent in SF and knowing mostly other young artists without capitol, I desired a way to live rent free, have a space to do my craft, and get to see more of the world. Inspired by the many historical artists who have longed similar longings I discovered the beauty of artist residencies. Lilo runs Adhoc Collective in Vienna which not only has a fully equipped artists creative studio, but an indoor halfpipe, and private artist quarters. It was like a modern day castle or skate cathedral. It exists in almost a utopic state, totally free to those that apply and come with a real passion for both art and skateboarding


"How To Lose Yourself Completely" by Bryan Schnelle

I just wanted to share with you a piece I recently finished which took me 4 years to complete. Titled "How To Lose Yourself Completely (The September Issue)", it consists of a copy of the September 2007 issue of Vogue magazine (the issue they made the documentary about) with all faces masked with a sharpie, and everything else entirely whited out. 840 pages of fun. -Bryan Schnelle


Tyler Bewley ~ Recent Works

Some great work from San Francisco based Tyler Bewley.


Kirk Maxson and Alexis Mackenzie at Eleanor Harwood Gallery

While walking our way across San Francisco on Saturday we swung through the opening receptions for Kirk Maxson and Alexis Mackenzie at Eleanor Harwood Gallery in the Mission.


Jeremy Fish Solo Show in Los Angeles

Jeremy Fish opens Hunting Trophies tonight, Saturday April 5th, at the Los Angeles based Mark Moore Gallery. The show features new work from Fish inside the "hunting lodge" where viewers climb inside the head of the hunter and explore the history of all the animals he's killed.


The Albatross and the Shipping Container

Beautiful piece entitled "The Albatross and the Shipping Container", Ink on Paper, Mounted to Panel, 47" Diameter, by San Francisco based Martin Machado now on display at FFDG. Stop in Saturday (1-6pm) to view the group show "Salt the Skies" now running through April 19th. 2277 Mission St. at 19th.


The Marsh Barge - Traveling the Mississippi River from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico

For some reason I thought it would be a good idea to quit my job, move out of my house, leave everything and travel again. So on August 21, 2013 I pushed a canoe packed full of gear into the headwaters of the Mississippi River in Lake Itasca, Minnesota, along with four of my best friends. Exactly 100 days later, I arrived at a marina near the Gulf of Mexico in a sailboat.


Flavio Samelo's Downtown Sao Paulo Murals

Our buddy Flavio Samelo down there in Brazil does all kinds of great work including this recent mural project in downtown Sao Paulo in front of one of the most important modern buildings of Oscar Niemeyer from the 60's, THE COPAN.


John Trippe, FFDG and Fecalface.com Founder, Stepping Down From Daily Operations

John Trippe, founder, owner and curator of FecalFace.com and the Mission District art gallery FFDG, announced today that he will stepping down from daily operations of the two ventures to seek new career opportunities.


High 5s - Get Your Feet Wet

I purchased one of the first digital cameras when Fecal Face went online in 2000. It was a massive Kodak with 2 mega pixels


"Touching Base" by Schuyler Beecroft

San Francisco based Schuyler Beecroft emailed over the great new series of paintings he's completed entitled "Touching Base", 16x20in on mounted wood panel. Like them.


Flume - Space Cadet (ft. Ghostface Killah & Autre Ne Veut)

Buddies Jay Howell & Jim Dirschberger did this great video produced by Forest City Rockers.


Fire Shelter for Papay Gyro Nights 2014

Last year we posted photos from another one of Simon Hjermind Jensen's Fire Shelters he's made in Copenhagen. This time around the Copenhagen based artist/ designer created one for the Papay Gyro Nights 2014 way up in on the Orkney Islands in Northern Scotland.


"Portrait of a Slugger 19" by Hiro Kurata

Beautiful painting by NYC based Hiro Kurata now on display at SF's FFDG through April 19th as part of the group show "Salt the Skies".


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